Professional Development for Healthcare Professions Blog

9 Steps to a Successful Medical Transcription Career, Part 2

Posted by Marcia Gordon on Mon, Nov 20, 2017 @ 11:00 AM

SuccessSTEP 2:  RESEARCH THE CAREER

Find out what being a medical transcriptionist is all about. You should all and speak with our experienced instructors. Read materials describing the profession. Visit the professional association’s website. A great first step is to schedule a call with an actual instructor to learn about the program and the profession.

STEP 3:  CHOOSE THE RIGHT PROGRAM FOR YOUR TRAINING

A high quality AHDI-Approved school will set you up for career success. Selecting an AHDI-approved school not only assures you that the curriculum will meet the minimum standards for success. It also assures students they will be mentored by CHDS instructors. An ideal instructor - student relationship would be one that allows you personalization and a more hands-on approach to your mentoring. The mentoring relationship is a back and forth interaction with a live instructor who is vested in your success. You get what you put into this relationship. It is not a passive one. You ask questions, receive feedback, and apply it going forward.

Be cautious of ‘tiered’ or ‘package’ programs. There should be a single program that teaches you everything you need to know as a transcriptionist to work any job. Make sure you understand which ‘tier’ or ‘package’ is the actual full program, as the lower tiers/packages may not provide a complete education. Do not count on the program to volunteer this information. Be sure to ask.

Ask how many students there are per instructor. Often you will learn that your work is graded by a computer versus a live instructor who can give you quality feedback.

Watch for programs that offer to graduate you in mere months, as this is not a realistic time frame for quality training in this career. Medical transcription is a lifelong career. To be successful, you must have quality training and actual experience. This quality and experience will take longer than 6-9 months. A quality program is going to take you about a year to finish

When seeking a program, watch for added “fluff” in the program’s material list. Ensure that there are no hidden charges later in the program that just pop up out of nowhere. Verify what materials are important to your training and what is filler used to make a program seem superior.

Read steps 4 and 5 next week

See how Med-Line can help you succeed

Topics: Professional Development, Medical Transcription Training