Professional Development for Healthcare Professions Blog

May/June Webinar List

Posted by Chad Sines on Thu, Apr 26, 2012 @ 07:58 PM

We have quite a few webinars scheduled for May and June. All at only $10. 

May Webinars 

Microsoft Powerpoint

Mon, May 7, 2012 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM PDT
Presenter: Chad Sines, MS, MBA, AHDI-F

In a virtual workforce, Powerpoint is heavily used in online presentations and meetings. Despite this most have only a rudimentary knowledge at best of how to use Powerpoint effectively. Participants will learn what Powerpoint is, how to use it, and learn how to make a basic presentation with title page, images, graphs, and other basic information that is used for a presentation. CEC: 1 TW

COPD 

Fri, May 18, 2012 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM PDT
Presenter: Diane Gilmore, CMT, AHDI-F

COPD is a serious lung disease and now the third leading cause of death in the United States as well as causing long-term disability.  This webinar explores the damage caused by COPD, a deeper discussion of its two main disorders of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, and its long-term impact on patient health. Both traditional and the latest cutting-edge diagnostic, pharmacological, and surgical treatment procedures used to slow progression of the disease will be discussed as well as current research into future treatment possibilities.  CEC: 1 CM (pending)

Irritable Bowel Syndrome 

Tue, May 29, 2012 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM PDT
Presenter: Chad Sines, MS, MBA, AHDI-F

Irritable bowel syndrome is considered a diagnosis of last resort, when nothing else fits. It is a very misunderstood disease with mostly symptomatic care. Attendees will learn why this disease baffles physicians and is commonly missed. Learn about the current trends in diagnosis and treatement as well as current research and novel treatments on the horizon. CEC: 1 CM (pending)

June Webinars  

Advanced Resume Building

Tue, Jun 5, 2012 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM PDT
Presenter: Chad Sines, MS, MBA, AHDI-F

Every professional knows they must have a current, professional-appearing resume. But do you know how to market your resume in a virtual environment? Companies like Pongo, Linkedin, Monster, etc, offer an excellent resource to potential employers but only if you know how to use them.  1 PD 

Oncology

Fri, Jun 15, 2012 12 PM - 2 PM PDT
Presenter: Diane Gilmore, CMT, AHDI-F

Cell structure and the genetic formation of cancer, the systems used to grade and classify cancers according to severity or metastasis, common lab and diagnostic tests used to analyze, detect, and diagnose, and various modalities of treatment.  Transcription tips, BOS rules, terminology nomenclature. CEC: 2 CM

Instant Messaging/Forums/Blogging

Tue, Jun 19, 2012 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM PDT
Presenter- Chad Sines, MS, MBA, AHDI-F

Communication is critical in a virtual workforce. Despite he many tools at their fingertips, many transcriptionists are uncomfortable using them. This webinar will introduce instant messaging, forum use, and blogging as tools for professionals to use to keep connected and network with each other. CEC: 1 PD

Topics: Continuing Education, Webinar

$6 Webinars Still Available

Posted by Chad Sines on Wed, Apr 25, 2012 @ 06:43 PM

Med-Line School of Medical TranscriptionA lot of CMTs are in need of CEC credits for their renewals. Many MTs are looking for some continuing education to help further their skill set. Students are looking for educational opportunities to get ahead in their training. We have developed several recorded webinar bundles to help you meet your specific educational needs at a phenomenal price. Each webinar averages $6, a price that no one can beat.

After you complete the purchase in PayPal, please allow a few seconds for PayPal to redirect you back to our website where you will receive the links to view your videos.

Click the title to purchase the bundle. AHDI-approved CECs are listed after each webinar title.

Professional Development Bundle- $30
Professional Development- No CEC
Facebook for the Professional- 1 PD
LinkedIn for the Professional- 1 PD
Twitter for the Professional- 1 PD
Advanced Resume Building- 1 PD

Transcription in the Workplace Bundle- $30
Microsoft Powerpoint 2010- 1 TW
Microsoft Excel 2010- 1 TW
Microsoft Outlook 2010- 1 TW
Microsoft Word 2010- 1 TW
Windows 7- 1 TW

Medical Transcription Tools Bundle- $30
Formatting for the Medical Transcription- 1 MTT
Common Transcription Errors- 1 MTT
Working with PDF Files- 1 MTT
BOS Specialty Standards, Part 1- 1 MTT
BOS Specialty Standards, Part 2- 1 MTT

Medicolegal Bundle- $30
HIPAA and HITECH- 1 ML
Regulatory Requirements- 1 ML
Risk Management- 1 ML
Medicolegal Aspects of the Healthcare Record- No CEC    
Critical Thinking- 1 TW

Level 1 Bundle- $30
Computer Basics - No CEC    
Dictation and Transcription Technology- No CEC        
Laboratory and Diagnostics- No CEC        
Internet Basics- No CEC    
Medical Terminology Review- No CEC    

Clinical Medicine I Bundle- $30
Cardiology- No CEC    
Neurology- No CEC    
Orthopedics- No CEC    
Oncology- No CEC    
Immunology- No CEC    

Clinical Medicine II Bundle- $30
Pulmonology- No CEC    
Ophthalmology- No CEC    
Fundamentals of Surgery in Transcription- No CEC    
GI- No CEC    
Dermatology- No CEC    

Topics: Continuing Education, Webinar

Monday Technology Tip- Forwarders Beware

Posted by Chad Sines on Mon, Apr 23, 2012 @ 01:00 PM

emailWhile not exactly a technology tip per se, it is one that people really need to know. Some people love to forward lots of stuff to people who honestly have no desire to receive it. Never, ever, ever forward random emails around to people on your contact list. People hate it with a burning passion and want to find you and break your computer when they get them. It makes you look unprofessional at best ultimately hurting your medical transcription career, and at worst, can cause people to block your correspondence. 

Things that are especially off limits of forwarding are jokes, reports of viruses (most are fake), anything political, anything of an adult nature, and anything that anyone could find offensive. These types of things are not appropriate for mass sharing ever. 

It is especially not acceptable to do so to work colleagues or your boss. Never use a company’s email account to send them either. People can mark the emails as spam which could result in your company’s email server being put on a black list as a spammer. Try explaining to your boss why their business emails could not get through because of your joke. Also try explaining to your boss why your client is upset about that joke about a current political figure they are proud supporters of. I can assure you that in both cases, you will find yourself in an unhappy position. 

There are things that are appropriate to forward. Latest industry news that is relevant is fair game to a list of people it will matter to. These shared tidbits are important for keeping current in your medical transcription career. I routinely forward ICD-10 news to instructors here. Forward major association news to those who you know would be interested but do not follow it themselves. Forward positive mentionings of your company. Everyone likes to see their company with positive exposure. Essentially you are forwarding purposeful news that is relevant to the receivers. Keep in mind that some people hate even this type of forwarding. 

If you are going to forward something that is relevant such as industry news, then be sure to take the extra junk out of the email. When you click forward, clean up the subject line to remove all the FW: More than one just screams “I am spamming you. Please hate me forever.” In the body of the email, remove all the past headers. Make the email look clean and professional. Not something that you just clicked forward and sent. 

If you keep this in mind and resist that urge to forward you will keep your friends and your professional reputation and be on your way to a bright medical transcription career.

Topics: Technology Tip

Did you Miss the Increasing Technology with Expanders Webinar?

Posted by Chad Sines on Fri, Apr 20, 2012 @ 05:00 PM

I sure hope you did not miss this amazing webinar. If you did, you missed out on tips that will save you time and help boost your line count ($$) as well as reduce errors. It is not too late to learn these tips You can click the title to purchase and view the archive at your leisure. This webinar will definitely benefit your medical transcription career.

productiveTitle: Increasing Technology with Text Expanders
Presenter: Diane Gilmore, CMT, AHDI-F
Length: 1 hour | Credits: 1.5 TW/1.5 MTT
Cost: $10

Join Diane as she explains and demonstrates the concept and handy uses for word expanding software for medical transcriptionists.  This workshop will help even the most seasoned MTs work smarter and produce more in less time with tips that will help maximize income.  Learn challenging new ways to use text expansion software in ways never thought possible to improve production and quality.  First learn helpful tips in building an organized library of text expander entries that is easy to remember, then go on to see how to make text expanders work in other amazing ways.  For example, learn how to make an entry backspace to enter punctuation marks such as quotes or hyphens, incorporate existing platform headings to eliminate time-consuming searching for headings in the platform listings, and even learn how to build an expander library from a basic foundation of word part entries.  This webinar is a must for production-oriented MTs.   

Watch the archived presentation!! 

Topics: Webinar

Webinar- $10 - Increasing Technology with Text Expanders

Posted by Chad Sines on Wed, Apr 18, 2012 @ 12:00 AM

describe the imageTitle: Increasing Technology with Text Expanders
When: Fri, Apr 20th 12 PM - 1:30 PM PDT
Presenter: Diane Gilmore, CMT, AHDI-F
Length: 1 hour | Credits: 1.5 TW/1.5 MTT
Cost: $10

Join Diane as she explains and demonstrates the concept and handy uses for word expanding software for medical transcriptionists.  This workshop will help even the most seasoned MTs work smarter and produce more in less time with tips that will help maximize income.  Learn challenging new ways to use text expansion software in ways never thought possible to improve production and quality.  First learn helpful tips in building an organized library of text expander entries that is easy to remember, then go on to see how to make text expanders work in other amazing ways.  For example, learn how to make an entry backspace to enter punctuation marks such as quotes or hyphens, incorporate existing platform headings to eliminate time-consuming searching for headings in the platform listings, and even learn how to build an expander library from a basic foundation of word part entries.  This webinar is a must for production-oriented MTs.   

Join us!! 

Topics: Webinar

Monday Technology Tip- Google

Posted by Chad Sines on Mon, Apr 16, 2012 @ 10:00 AM

google headphonesLast week we mentioned Wikipedia and how it can benefit your transcription career. This week I wanted to mention Google. Google is awesome. There is just no way around it. Many will advise you to not use Google for information. In this day and age where there are so many authoritative resources online this makes no sense. Medicine is changing faster than book publishers can keep up with. You will not use random pages as authoritative, but you can use it to get information that you will then verify with an authoritative source.

Google is great for when you kinda can spell something but are off a bit. The search function will often “guess” the spelling which can help lead you in the right direction. Keep in mind that it is looking for pages with the word in it, so commonly misspelled words will pull up many versions of the word. Still, it can jog your memory so you can then look it up in the right place. 

There is no denying that Google is great for learning about new procedures, medications, and medical tools. This knowledge will benefit your transcription career. Often you can find a great deal of information on vendor’s sites or medical school sites. When I hear about a new device or medication, I like to Google it to see what is out there. It is for information to add to what I know, not to be placed in a medical document. 

So enjoy Google, but do not take anything you read as final, especially MT help sites, until you verify it from a real authoritative source. Do this and you will enjoy many continuing education opportunities throughout your transcription career.

Topics: Technology Tip

Continuing Education Webinar- Critical Thinking

Posted by Chad Sines on Sat, Apr 14, 2012 @ 01:00 PM

Med-Line School of Medical TranscriptionTitle: Critical Thinking
When: Tue, Apr 17, 2012 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM PDT
Presenter: Maggie Thebeault, CMT, AHDI-F
Length: 1 hour | Credits: 1 PD
Cost: $10

Review exercises, tips, and activities designed to explore decision making. Reviewing tools used by critical thinkers. Several interactive practice activities, including editing.

The Critical Thinking continuing education webinar is one which will challenge MTs to think at a higher level. This is a definite must attend.

Join us!! 

Wednesday Transcription Tip- Earphones & Privacy

Posted by Chad Sines on Wed, Apr 11, 2012 @ 10:00 AM

earphonesI had an MT ask me the other day if it was okay to transcribe without using ear phones, e.g. using their speakers. The short answer is no. If others can hear the audio, then you are violating HIPAA. Even in healthcare facilities where the entire office staff is covered with privacy paperwork, it is not okay to just share information. Each person being exposed to medical information has to have a need for the information. Playing audio aloud shares private information with anyone and everyone nearby. You never know who is listening or who might be on a phone nearby. 

So get used to the headphones. I used to use the $300 Bose, but they are not needed. Personally I like the cheap $10 iPhone earbuds. The audio is easier to hear, you will make fewer mistakes, and you will preserve privacy. 

Topics: Transcription Tip

Webinar- $10 - Encryption- Not Just for the Techies

Posted by Chad Sines on Mon, Apr 09, 2012 @ 05:00 PM

Med-Line School of Medical TranscriptionTitle: Encryption- Not Just for the Techies
When: Tue, Apr 10, 2012 3 PM - 4 PM PDT
Presenter:  Chad Sines, MS, MBA, AHDI-F
Length: 1 hour
Credits: 1 TW/MTT
Cost: $10 

Gone is the time when the transcriptionist can expect their tech department to handle all their encryption needs. With the serious bite of HITECH, MTs are on notice that they must personally be using encryption on devices that handle PHI. Additionally, wise individuals know to encrypt personally-sensitive information such as banking, correspondence, and other information they wish to stay private. Participants will learn what encryption is, how to use it, and learn how to use a free high-level encryption program to secure their machine. 1 TW/MTT

Join us!!

Topics: Webinar

Monday Technology Tip- Wikipedia

Posted by Chad Sines on Mon, Apr 09, 2012 @ 02:19 PM

wikipediaThis will be a very short tip, but hopefully that will make the point clearer. Wikipedia is not a reliable source of information. Ironically even doctoral candidates do not understand this.

While the information is often correct, it should not be treated as authoritative. Anyone can edit articles and clearly not everyone knows what they are talking about. It is definitely useful for supplemental information and to point you in the right direction, but always use an authoritative source to back up your work. What I do like it for is background information for something that is new. It can be a great source of information for many things that you want to add to your collective knowledge but realize its limitations. 

Topics: Technology Tip

Wednesday Transcription Tip- Word Expanders

Posted by Chad Sines on Wed, Apr 04, 2012 @ 04:54 PM

increaseIf you have not started exploring the topic of text expanders, then now is a good time to start. Text expanders allow an MT to drastically increase their productivity by minimizing key strokes. A typical expander works by recognizing short forms that you develop for words and then expanding them into the long form. Many suggest using the first three letters of a word and the last letter as the short form. An example might be abdl for abdominal. Every time you would use this shortcut you would save about four letters. Many use pt for patient, hy for history, rx for prescription, and so on. Just these few simple shortcuts can save many keystrokes over time. 

An MT can and should develop their own list of shortcuts over time. This is much better than simply importing lists that others give you. The goal is to use shortcuts that you know and will use versus just looking to build a large database.  

A lot of people begin by using MS Words autocorrect to define some basic shortcuts. While this works okay in the beginning, it quickly becomes burdensome to add new forms quickly, backup, and take the shortcuts with you. Using a commercial expander program like SpeedType allows an MT to quickly develop, edit, import, and export shortcuts. It also allows you to take the shortcuts with you to multiple computers and works with any Windows program seamlessly. Over a very short course of time these programs pay for themselves.

Topics: Transcription Tip

Monday Technology Tip- What is a RHIO?

Posted by Chad Sines on Mon, Apr 02, 2012 @ 01:38 PM

RHIOPerhaps you have not heard this term before, but hopefully you have. A RHIO (regional health information organization) is an organization that has many stakeholders who share a common interest in seeing that healthcare information is exchanged quickly and effectively. They are engaged in health information exchange (HIE). The goal is for information to come from one facility, go to the RHIO, and then be available to another facility that most likely is using a completely different system that the original facility. The information needs to come through in a way that is meaningful and useful. 

Here is a basic visual representation of a RHIO and how it works.

RHIO

There are three types of setups, the centralized, federated, and the hybrid. 
  • Centralized: Data is sent to a central collector of information on a regular basis. The data remains uniform and allows  for greatest interoperability. The downside is that scalability becomes a problem. The system is also more complex and more prone to becoming a data ownership. 
  • Federated (Record Locator Service) allows for fast retrieval of data. Instead of store the data, the system tells the user where it can get the data. Since the data is only pointed to and not stored, there are no ownership issues. There are significant issues with a lack of standardization, availability of the data, and how to maintain authorized access. 
  • The hybrid system seeks to bridge the two. Still in its infancy, the hybrid stores the data but the patient has the choice of who is to be storing the data. A record locator ability will direct to this data. 
So the big takeaway is that a RHIO is an organization that is meant to allow an efficient exchange of health information in a way that is meaningful and useful.  

Topics: Technology Tip